Interview Almost Over: Vital Questions to Ask

By on September 11, 2013

Fotolia_47387912_XSIt’s rare for an employer to hire based on experience and qualifications alone. In general, it often comes down to the candidate who gives the best interview.

The way that you end your job interview is almost as important as the way you started it. You need to leave a lasting impression by appearing as clear and confident as possible.

Towards the close of the interview you’ll often be given an opportunity to ask questions. You need to be fully prepared for this; otherwise it can look as though you want to end quickly. What’s more, good questions reinforce engagement and demonstrate you have an ongoing interest in the organization.

Closing questions to ask include:

  • What is the Company’s mission statement?
  • What are the goals of the Company and were they met last year?
  • Who will be my immediate supervisor?
  • What are my potential job advancement opportunities?
  • When will a hiring decision be made?
  • What is the office dress code?

At the start of the interview, you would have shaken hands with the potential employer. It’s a good rule to also shake hands upon leaving. You want the interviewers to be left with a positive impression of you.

Also seize the moment and show your gratitude to the interviewer or interview panel. In this way, you’re demonstrating your gratitude for being offered this job opportunity.

Finally, don’t hesitate to follow-up with a (very) brief thank-you note or phone call as appropriate. It demonstrates your seriousness and ongoing enthusiasm in wanting to work for the company.

By paying close attention to the interview closing details you’ll help to project to your potential employers the right impression that can positively contribute to securing that job offer. Perhaps you have some favorite closing questions you’d like to share? Please feel free to post a comment below.

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2 Comments

  1. Bernie Baker

    October 23, 2013 at 3:56 am

    I know that most of us are usually ‘desperate’ by the time we hit that interview chair but we should be asking questions to, we should be somewhat interviewing the interviewer. I always ask why the position is available? Why did the previous person leave? I want to get a feel for the rate of attrition.

  2. Ray

    December 10, 2013 at 7:35 am

    Great post! I’d recommend reading the book “How to Interview Like a Top MBA.” It really helped me improve my interview skills.

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